WISDOM FROM THE SEMI-GUT SAVVY

As all survivors know, once diagnosed with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), the only way to prevent it from developing into colon cancer is to remove the patient’s colon. Losing your colon can be daunting, leaving patients with so many questions. Will my life be normal? What can i eat? How do you deal with dating and an ileostomy? And there are countless life adjustments that continue and change over the years.

In this section survivors of colon cancer and FAPers who have had colectomies, j-pouches, or ileostomies share tips and information to help newly diagnosed patients make the adjustment. Be sure to check back regularly for more and more words of wisdom from your savvy fellow semi-gutted. If you are a survivor and have something that you wish you someone had told you in the beginning and would like to contribute to this section, please email us at yo@destinationxride.orgAlso, folks with ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s endure many of the same surgical procedures, soooo if you’re a one of those kick ass sans-colon types, we would love to hear from you ass well.

NO GUTS, NO GLORY — THE MUSINGS OF A SEMICOLON.

If there’s one thing us gut-challenged peeps know, it’s that our guts are definitely challenging. I don’t purport to understand how those who have had colectomies or have ostomies, FAP (Familial Adenomatous Polyposis), or various forms of IBD (Inflammatory Bowel...

MONICA ON HER FAP, ILEOSTOMY, BATTLE SCARS AND JOURNEY FOWARD.

Hmm, living without a colon. Where should I start? I was fortunate that my FAP was diagnosed the summer I turned 15. Unfortunately that was too late to save my colon since I already had thousands of polyps. My total colectomy was back in 1989 so that before...